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The Untapped Market for Increasing Muscle Mass

The Untapped Market for Increasing Muscle Mass

Many people consider losing strength to be a natural part of aging, like gray hair or wrinkles on the skin. But the reality is that the loss of muscle mass related to the natural aging process — also known as sarcopenia — is actually a health concern, associated with adverse outcomes like functional decline, falls, and hospitalization[1]. In fact, as early as 1999, the CDC recognized sarcopenia as one of the top five major US health risks.

The good news is that Baby Boomers are listening. This is a group that’s incredibly interested in maintaining a good quality of life and independence as they age, and brands that offer supplements supporting muscle mass are indeed targeting this population with clear age-related marketing messages. As a result, a market for supplements addressing sarcopenia exists in the US, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the UK, and Japan[2]. The problem? Brands are not yet engaging with or educating younger shoppers who can benefit from a preemptive supplement plan. And their messaging, which resonates clearly with Boomers, is excluding a whole segment of younger consumers who are willing and able to invest in their health.

While sarcopenia is associated with the aging population, loss of muscle mass happens earlier than most Millennials are willing to admit. Experts estimate that by the time we hit our 30s, we start losing as much as 3 to 5 percent of muscle mass per decade[3], and that percentage only accelerates with time. Indeed, there’s a gap in education and awareness here, which is one reason why the sarcopenia supplement market is still in its infancy — in both the number of brands offering such products as well as sales of these products — reaching just $7 million in market value[4].

One way to grow this market is to expand the target consumer base to include the some 71 million Millennials[5] who can benefit from both practical physical education as well as information about incorporating smart supplementation into their muscle preserving plans. A tactic that appeals to consumers young and old? Protein.

We already know that protein ingestion helps build muscle mass. We also know that many people don’t consume enough protein. This is especially true for the over-65 population, 40 percent of whom are estimated to fall short of the recommended daily amount but who, at the same time, need more protein than any other age group[6].  Indeed, protein powders and other supplements deserve a place in any muscle-building plan.

But when consumers — young and old — turn to protein supplements, they often experience unpleasant side effects like occasional constipation, bloating, and gas, all because protein is a large molecule that’s difficult for the body to break down. Plus, without proper digestion, the body can’t utilize protein supplements to their maximum potential. Enter enzymes.

A protein optimizer like BioCore AminoTap® PS works alongside protein to not only digest protein for optimal absorption, but help to minimize some of the unpleasant side effects that can contribute to discontinuing use. The result is better bioavailability, minimized side effects, and a more well-rounded muscle preserving plan.

 


[1] http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0169548

[2] Sarcopenia – Market Insights, Epidemiology and Market Forecast -2023-7 MM. (2017, November 09). Retrieved April 13, 2018, from https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/sarcopenia—market-insights-epidemiology-and-market-forecast–2023-7-mm-300553648.html

[3] Harvard Men’s Health Watch: Preserve Your Muscle Mass. (2016, February). Retrieved April 13, 2018, from https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/preserve-your-muscle-mass

[4] Sarcopenia – Market Insights, Epidemiology and Market Forecast -2023-7 MM. (2017, November 09). Retrieved April 13, 2018, from https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/sarcopenia—market-insights-epidemiology-and-market-forecast–2023-7-mm-300553648.html

[5] Millennials projected to overtake Baby Boomers as America’s largest generation. (2018, March 1). Retrieved April 13, 2018, from http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/03/01/millennials-overtake-baby-boomers

[6] http://www.berkeleywellness.com/healthy-eating/nutrition/article/do-you-need-more-protein

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